Shaniyah Frazier

Ideas in Antiquity

Week 6

On Spotting A Bad Mentee

Reading on Monday and Thoughts:

I like how the chapter starts off with the first female president of Duke University. One, I wondered how long ago did Mrs. Keohane become the first president of Duke University which I know has been an institution since the late 19th century. After I did some research, a quick google search, I found out that Duke didn’t have their first female president till 2004. I find that extremely interesting, and I believe she is the only female president of Duke University. I looked on Duke.edu and she does not even appear on their timeline or on their website. I find that interesting. Nevertheless, I do find what she says to be interesting and I completely agree. She is basically saying to watch out for selfish leaders. “Those who agree to become ministers must be able to think first of the good of the organization and concentrate on helping the leader succeed, rather than directly advancing their personal ambitions. Such men and women may, and often do, aspire to higher leadership themselves and rightly see the ministerial office as a step along that path, but while they are serving as ministers, they must subordinate their personal goals to those of the leader whom they have agreed to serve.” I believe this is what is so hard about being a leader, it is hard to be completely selfless, however, it is necessary.

I decided not to revise my journal because it is supposed to be my raw thoughts, in my opinion at least. I have made a mistake about what this lesson was going to be about. It is not about having a bad mentor, but having a bad mentee. What Keohane was saying was that Mentees must be selfless and help their leader, not just about their own ambitions. I feel like I have spoken about this in previous journals, but Professor. Sandridge should really consider including the Star Wars storyline in his lesson because Anakin was a horrible mentee. He did not think of his leader/Mentor Obi-Wan Kenobi, he only thought of his own desires and often was very careless and thoughtless if it did not have anything to do with saving Padme. He even killed children. Babies. I wonder if the main character of this story will be comparable in action to Anakin.

The author of this book sounds extremely educated and extremely absorbed into literature. From the chapter, it states He began working hard and did far more work himself than all of his co-workers combined. Angry, they told him to slow it down before they all lost their jobs. For years thereafter, Borges would go to work, work but little, and then sit and read all day, quitting, finally, when he had read all of the books in the library. Regardless of its veracity, Borges’s knowledge was encyclopedic, covering topics and themes so vast that Umberto Eco struggled to find something on which Borges had not written. I wish I had this much ambition and desire for knowledge in my life.

I like how the chapter starts off with the first female president of Duke University. One, I wondered how long ago did Mrs. Keohane become the first president of Duke University which I know has been an institution since the late 19th century. After I did some research, a quick google search, I found out that Duke didn’t have their first female president till 2004. I find that extremely interesting, and I believe she is the only female president of Duke University. I looked on Duke.edu and she does not even appear on their timeline or on their website. I find that interesting. Nevertheless, I do find what she says to be interesting and I completely agree. She is basically saying to watch out for selfish leaders. “Those who agree to become ministers must be able to think first of the good of the organization and concentrate on helping the leader succeed, rather than directly advancing their personal ambitions. Such men and women may, and often do, aspire to higher leadership themselves and rightly see the ministerial office as a step along that path, but while they are serving as ministers, they must subordinate their personal goals to those of the leader whom they have agreed to serve.” I believe this is what is so hard about being a leader, it is hard to be completely selfless, however, it is necessary.

I decided not to revise my journal because it is supposed to be my raw thoughts, in my opinion at least. I have made a mistake about what this lesson was going to be about. It is not about having a bad mentor, but having a bad mentee. What Keohane was saying was that Mentees must be selfless and help their leader, not just about their own ambitions. I feel like I have spoken about this in previous journals, but Professor. Sandridge should really consider including the Star Wars storyline in his lesson because Anakin was a horrible mentee. He did not think of his leader/Mentor Obi-Wan Kenobi, he only thought of his own desires and often was very careless and thoughtless if it did not have anything to do with saving Padme. He even killed children. Babies. I wonder if the main character of this story will be comparable in action to Anakin.

The author of this book sounds extremely educated and extremely absorbed into literature. From the chapter, it states He began working hard and did far more work himself than all of his co-workers combined. Angry, they told him to slow it down before they all lost their jobs. For years thereafter, Borges would go to work, work but little, and then sit and read all day, quitting, finally, when he had read all of the books in the library. Regardless of its veracity, Borges’s knowledge was encyclopedic, covering topics and themes so vast that Umberto Eco struggled to find something on which Borges had not written. I wish I had this much ambition and desire for knowledge in my life.

“Azevedo Bandeira gives him the impression, even though he’s burly, the impression of being poorly put together; in his aspect, which always seems to be too close, is the face of the Jew, the black man, and the Indian; in his physique, the monkey and the tiger; the scar that runs across his face is just another ornament, like his bristly black mustache. “ I do not like this passage that much because to me it implies that the jew, the black man, and the Indian are poorly put to getter in essence. I do not like this, but I guess since he is recognizing this maybe he is condemning this pairing of groups of people.

After reading it is clear that this man has mental issues and is extremely narcissistic and as pointed out in the chapter, Antisocial. I almost feel bad for him. He is like a lone wolf with no love, no empathy. I am confused as to who is worse of a person Bandeira or Otalara.